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Hey Guys! My name is Chelsea + this is The Noterie - a collection of notes about my family adventures + the lessons I learn along the way. Thanks for stopping by!

Note: DIY Shiplap Wall

Note: DIY Shiplap Wall

Measuring + cutting each of our MDF boards.
Installing the outlet extenders. 
Measuring out + marking studs. 
Using cardboard box as a "shim" to create the spacing between each board that we liked. 
Measuring for our final board!
JACK'S LETTERS: 

On Saturday, we realized that we are only FOUR months away from meeting our baby boy! We're so excited, also absolutely terrified, but more so determined that we may need to start preparing our home for his arrival. Lucky for us, my in-laws were in town + able to help us with our first step for Jack's nursery : SHIPLAP. I'm a major Joanna Gaines/Fixer Upper fan, so I was so excited to get this project going. 

If you're like me + interested in adding this type of accent wall to your house, below is a short DIY on all you need for your very own shiplap wall + how to carry out the project!

SUPPLIES TO PURCHASE:

  • 1x6 16' MDF board: We bought this because it was already primed + went with the more modern look we wanted for Jack's room, but there are more affordable options out there depending on the style you want! I found the best pricing at 84 Lumber + the boards were already primed (less paint/less work.)
  • 2.5" Finishing Nails
  • Raised Outlet Covers

TOOLS NEEDED:

  • Cardboard Box: Cut into pieces to use as a shim 
  • 4' Level 
  • Carpenter Pencil
  • 12" Pry Bar
  • Razor Knife 
  • Tape Measure
  • Miter Saw: If you don't own one or have access to one, you can use a skill saw or have Home Depot/84 Lumber cut the MDF board for you into the size you need. 
  • Finishing Gun: If you don't own one or have access to borrow one, you can also use a hammer, it will just increase the time needed for the project.

DIRECTIONS:

  • Measure the height + length of your wall so you know exactly how many MDF boards you need. Although the MDF boards are labeled 1x6 in the store, they are actually 5.5" wide so make sure to take this into account when accounting for how many boards you will need. 
  • Once you have acquired all of your materials, remove the baseboard. To do this, you will first run your razor knife along the edge where the caulking of the baseboard meets the wall. You do not want to cut into the wall, so make sure your cut isn't too deep, just deep enough to break the caulking. Once you have made a cut, take your pry bar + hammer to gently pull the baseboard away from the wall. 
  • Remove your outlet covers (if any) from the accent wall + add your raised outlet covers. Make sure the covers are level. 
  • If you did not choose to have your boards cut from Home Depot or Lowe's, cut your boards now. It's a good idea for you to measure the length of the wall multiple times as some older homes will not have perfectly flush walls (like ours!) We had to measure a few times + cut our MDF boards to various lengths so that they would fit correctly. Because we knew this, Cody and his Dad measured every three boards to ensure each set was correct.
  • Now you will need to mark your studs with your Carpenter's Pencil + Measuring Tape. Measure 16" from the corner of the wall. Hammer one nail into this space to make sure you are right on the stud. If so, measure + mark every 16". If you can't find the first stud, you can also look for "nail pops" which will show where a stud is located. 
  • With each stud marked, take your 4' level and draw a straight line up the wall along the stud line so you know exactly where to nail once you lay your boards. 
  • Lay your first board at the base of the wall. Make sure it is perfectly flush with each end. This is where things may get tricky as you try to fit it flush with the other walls' baseboards. We needed to cut a bit from each of the opposing walls baseboards.
  • Once the board is layed + you have double checked to make sure it is level, use your nailgun or hammer to nail 2.5" finishing nails along the top + bottom of the board at each stud that you have marked. We placed our 1/4" away from the top + bottom of the board, but the placement is entirely up to you.
  • Lay the second board. Take your cardboard box that has been cut into small pieces and place between the 1st and 2nd board to use as a "shim" so you have that small gap between each board like we have in the photo. Make sure the board is level, then nail top + bottom along the board where each stud line is. 
  • Repeat to the ceiling.
  • Your top board may need to be cut into a smaller height (like ours) depending on the height of the ceiling. Make sure to measure this once you lay your second to last board. 
  • Voila! The hard work is done! Now just check to make sure the nails are flush + lightly sand over any scuffs before you paint. 

NOTE: Depending on outlets being on your wall, you may need to cut the board(s) that will land on the outlets into pieces so that they will fit, or cut openings into each board for the outlet. We chose to cut our boards into three pieces that hit the outlets (although you can't really tell once the outlet covers were placed on).

Note: Mount Laurel Fall Festival

Note: Mount Laurel Fall Festival

Note: But first, Waffles.

Note: But first, Waffles.